rosetyler-in-the-impala:

As a disclaimer before I begin, I do not represent the whole of the pro-life movement. I represent the beliefs of many, but not of all. 
The first thing I would like to tell you all is that, in my case, the Pro-Life movement is a very sensitive subject for me, because of the way I believe. I am a Christian, but I’d like to think that I approach this topic, as well as others, with a slight touch more logic and reason than do the majority of my brothers and sisters in Christ. 
Thus, I present to you my beliefs and their explanations.
First, I must ask a question. Why is it, even in cases in which the mother is ambivalent to her pregnancy, that a woman, upon miscarrying her child, is so distraught? According to Martha Diamond, PhD of the American Psychological Association, “[they] will spend enormous amounts of emotional energy trying to explain why it happened,” Diamond says. “They often blame themselves, even when it is inaccurate, to help make sense of it. Women may torment themselves with guilt and blame, rewriting the story, so to speak: ‘If I hadn’t gone to the grocery store’ or ‘If I didn’t stay up so late.’ It’s a way of coping with the loss. I’ve come to see this as part of the grief process.”
Diamond even recounts the story of a sixteen-year-old girl who miscarried an unwanted pregnancy and became “grief-stricken.” The tragedy of miscarriage, the American Psychological Association finds, even has a harrowing effect on men, who often “mask their grief over a miscarriage as anger.” (You can read about the APA’s study of miscarriage and it’s psychological effects here:   http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/06/miscarriage.aspx ).
Why, I ask, is a miscarriage such a “traumatic loss?” 
Why, even in cases in which the pregnancy was unwanted, is the loss of a fetus— a mere conglomeration of rapidly replicating amino acids, proteins, stem cells— a cataclysm in the life of the sexual partners who created that conglomeration?
I postulate that our human nature— whether we are able to prove  the fact through science or not— recognizes the human nature of this pulsating mass of cell replication. I postulate that a fetus, from its very conception, is, in fact, a human being with rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. I postulate, in accordance with my dualistic worldview, that the soul of the parents mourns the soul of the child. 
To lightly touch on the subject of dualism— that is, the belief that the world consists of both the spiritual and the physical— please hear this: look around you. Look at the bedroom, the office, the bus station, wherever you are sitting. Look and understand. Look at the people around you and if you are by yourself, look in the mirror. Aren’t people fascinating? We’re so self-aware that we’re barely aware of anything else. We think and feel and calculate and laugh. Is it really so preposterous to think that, within each and every one of we marvelous beings, therein lies a soul? A spiritual self? An origin for all the beautifully irrational love and hate and humor and cynicism in all the people all around you? 
 That being said, I would like to address the above post.
I agree that shutting down abortion clinics does drive women to “back alley” abortion clinics and that it is not in the best public interest to continue shutting these institutions down. However— and I hesitate to articulate my beliefs in such a graphic and radical manner— I consider abortion to be murder; it is the taking of a human life without recognition of that life’s worth, potential, or voice. Thus, I am conflicted concerning the best action of public policy. I have no idea what to do and I am willing to admit it openly.
For me, the Pro-Life movement is definitely about babies. But it is also about the life of these women and men who take part in abortion. Losing something precious is traumatic, and I don’t want that for anyone. 
I understand that the Word of God has no standing in governmental issues whatsoever, but allow me to present the notion that, throughout history— whether you believe God inspired the Bible or not— the commandments there have been to keep man from harm. 
God commanded the Israelites to stay away from tattoos and shellfish, both of which posed major health risks to them in their time.
God commanded the Isrealites not to covet one another’s possessions, for envy leads to strife, which leads to conflicts.
Jesus made it clear that it was in man’s best interest to have only one sexual partner. He meant morally, but if you look from a hygienic and medical standpoint, you can see clearly that this commandment points to the avoidance of many STDs. 
So, if the commands in the Bible invariably (feel free to message me on that one) lead man toward health, their origin should be of little consequence to the rational onlooker. 
Next, I want to point out that I do believe that a woman has the freedom to choose what she does with her body. However, that choice comes in when she chooses to engage in sexual activities that put her at risk of pregnancy. Women are fundamentally, anatomically different from men and are at greater risk when presented with sexual activities. It is a woman’s choice to do what she pleases with her body, but she does not have the authority to abort the life of her child, no matter her socioeconomic standing, her morality, her religion. The only time at which I consider an abortion acceptable is when the mother’s life— not her health —is endangered. Even at this point, I consider the abortion an abominable and tragic cost-benefit analysis in which a medical practitioner must decide between losing the both the child and the mother or losing the child alone. 
All that to make this final point: 
We don’t want to punish women for having sex. We don’t want to punish anyone for anything. That is not our job as people; it is the job of God Almighty and the authorities on earth. We want to preserve life. We passionately believe that a fetus is a life and that human nature points to that notion’s veracity. We believe that a pregnancy— a child, a life— is not a punishment for “unapproved sex,” but the silver lining itself. A child is a chance. A chance to teach and to learn and to live. I have never had a child, but I look forward to it someday, and the many women in my life who have had children— wanted or not— acknowledge the value of life.
Tumblr, we of all types of people should recognize the beauty of life when we see it. We see ourselves in the lives of the myriad of characters and adore the lessons we learn there. We cherish the beauty of a romance and the gravity of a death. We forgive sins, acknowledge faults, and even love unconditionally. Surely we, of all people, should know the value of each life as young love concieves them?

rosetyler-in-the-impala:

As a disclaimer before I begin, I do not represent the whole of the pro-life movement. I represent the beliefs of many, but not of all. 

The first thing I would like to tell you all is that, in my case, the Pro-Life movement is a very sensitive subject for me, because of the way I believe. I am a Christian, but I’d like to think that I approach this topic, as well as others, with a slight touch more logic and reason than do the majority of my brothers and sisters in Christ. 

Thus, I present to you my beliefs and their explanations.

First, I must ask a question. Why is it, even in cases in which the mother is ambivalent to her pregnancy, that a woman, upon miscarrying her child, is so distraught? According to Martha Diamond, PhD of the American Psychological Association, “[they] will spend enormous amounts of emotional energy trying to explain why it happened,” Diamond says. “They often blame themselves, even when it is inaccurate, to help make sense of it. Women may torment themselves with guilt and blame, rewriting the story, so to speak: ‘If I hadn’t gone to the grocery store’ or ‘If I didn’t stay up so late.’ It’s a way of coping with the loss. I’ve come to see this as part of the grief process.”

Diamond even recounts the story of a sixteen-year-old girl who miscarried an unwanted pregnancy and became “grief-stricken.” The tragedy of miscarriage, the American Psychological Association finds, even has a harrowing effect on men, who often “mask their grief over a miscarriage as anger.” (You can read about the APA’s study of miscarriage and it’s psychological effects here:   http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/06/miscarriage.aspx ).

Why, I ask, is a miscarriage such a “traumatic loss?” 

Why, even in cases in which the pregnancy was unwanted, is the loss of a fetus— a mere conglomeration of rapidly replicating amino acids, proteins, stem cells— a cataclysm in the life of the sexual partners who created that conglomeration?

I postulate that our human nature— whether we are able to prove  the fact through science or not— recognizes the human nature of this pulsating mass of cell replication. I postulate that a fetus, from its very conception, is, in fact, a human being with rights to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. I postulate, in accordance with my dualistic worldview, that the soul of the parents mourns the soul of the child.

To lightly touch on the subject of dualism— that is, the belief that the world consists of both the spiritual and the physical— please hear this: look around you. Look at the bedroom, the office, the bus station, wherever you are sitting. Look and understand. Look at the people around you and if you are by yourself, look in the mirror. Aren’t people fascinating? We’re so self-aware that we’re barely aware of anything else. We think and feel and calculate and laugh. Is it really so preposterous to think that, within each and every one of we marvelous beings, therein lies a soul? A spiritual self? An origin for all the beautifully irrational love and hate and humor and cynicism in all the people all around you?

 That being said, I would like to address the above post.

I agree that shutting down abortion clinics does drive women to “back alley” abortion clinics and that it is not in the best public interest to continue shutting these institutions down. However— and I hesitate to articulate my beliefs in such a graphic and radical manner— I consider abortion to be murder; it is the taking of a human life without recognition of that life’s worth, potential, or voice. Thus, I am conflicted concerning the best action of public policy. I have no idea what to do and I am willing to admit it openly.

For me, the Pro-Life movement is definitely about babies. But it is also about the life of these women and men who take part in abortion. Losing something precious is traumatic, and I don’t want that for anyone. 

I understand that the Word of God has no standing in governmental issues whatsoever, but allow me to present the notion that, throughout history— whether you believe God inspired the Bible or not— the commandments there have been to keep man from harm. 

  • God commanded the Israelites to stay away from tattoos and shellfish, both of which posed major health risks to them in their time.
  • God commanded the Isrealites not to covet one another’s possessions, for envy leads to strife, which leads to conflicts.
  • Jesus made it clear that it was in man’s best interest to have only one sexual partner. He meant morally, but if you look from a hygienic and medical standpoint, you can see clearly that this commandment points to the avoidance of many STDs. 

So, if the commands in the Bible invariably (feel free to message me on that one) lead man toward health, their origin should be of little consequence to the rational onlooker. 

Next, I want to point out that I do believe that a woman has the freedom to choose what she does with her body. However, that choice comes in when she chooses to engage in sexual activities that put her at risk of pregnancy. Women are fundamentally, anatomically different from men and are at greater risk when presented with sexual activities. It is a woman’s choice to do what she pleases with her body, but she does not have the authority to abort the life of her child, no matter her socioeconomic standing, her morality, her religion. The only time at which I consider an abortion acceptable is when the mother’s life— not her health —is endangered. Even at this point, I consider the abortion an abominable and tragic cost-benefit analysis in which a medical practitioner must decide between losing the both the child and the mother or losing the child alone. 

All that to make this final point: 

We don’t want to punish women for having sex. We don’t want to punish anyone for anything. That is not our job as people; it is the job of God Almighty and the authorities on earth. We want to preserve life. We passionately believe that a fetus is a life and that human nature points to that notion’s veracity. We believe that a pregnancy— a child, a life— is not a punishment for “unapproved sex,” but the silver lining itself. A child is a chance. A chance to teach and to learn and to live. I have never had a child, but I look forward to it someday, and the many women in my life who have had children— wanted or not— acknowledge the value of life.

Tumblr, we of all types of people should recognize the beauty of life when we see it. We see ourselves in the lives of the myriad of characters and adore the lessons we learn there. We cherish the beauty of a romance and the gravity of a death. We forgive sins, acknowledge faults, and even love unconditionally. Surely we, of all people, should know the value of each life as young love concieves them?

(Source: jonahripley)

universally-sanctioned:

I could NOT stop smiling when I saw this

The battle between Banksy and Robbo http://www.banksy.co.uk/QA/camden/camden4.html#

essentialisinvisible:

Street Art War Between Banksy And King Robbo From 2009-2012

casey2j:

spinnetod:

image

Post Season 7 - Accidentally Baby

Castiel drops in on an unusually aloof Meg after his return from Purgatory. She successfully evaded Crowley, but she has an even bigger problem on her hands. He may be the father, but after being absent for nearly the…

(Source: demonofdiscord)

sailor-ivey:

i am dying and a half here

sailor-ivey:

i am dying and a half here

aazure:


This Marine found four baby rabbits stranded with a lifeless mother. Instead of leaving them to die, he took them in. He has been taking care of them until the rabbits can be released back into the wild. This picture shows the Marine feeding one of the babies with a dropper.

oh my god

aazure:

This Marine found four baby rabbits stranded with a lifeless mother. Instead of leaving them to die, he took them in. He has been taking care of them until the rabbits can be released back into the wild. This picture shows the Marine feeding one of the babies with a dropper.

oh my god

possumtree:

Happy Earth Day everyone! :) We are celebrating by caring for these baby bunnies someone found Saturday. They will be going to the wildlife rescue on Wednesday! :) 

REMEMBER: If you find baby bunnies in a nest without a mother, it’s because the mother only visits the nest twice a day - once in the morning and once in the evening. If you think the babies have been abandoned, put yarn over the nest in a tic-tac-toe design, or sprinkle a ring of flour around the nest. Check back the next morning. If the yarn and flour are still undisturbed, the nest has been abandoned. Contact a rehabber! 

batlock:

offmytitsonhappiness:

Can we just stop and appreciate Nicki Minaj’s face for a moment. She looks genuinely very concerned for Josh here, like she thinks he was actually in an arena full of kids trying to kill him, and is confused as to why no one else finds this as shocking as she does.

What do you expect? People from the Capitol just don’t understand.

(Source: jemward, via violetcancerian)

“I’m scared about the finale”

~ everyone who has ever been a fan of a TV show (via lastisle)

(Source: youkicklikeanineyearoldgirl-cm, via brokeback-purgatory)